In his latest publication Dr Salveson explores the cultural heritage and identity of Lancashire, stretching from the Mersey to the Lake District, charting the county’s transformation from a largely agricultural region noted for its religious learning into the Industrial Revolution’s powerhouse, as an emerging self-confident bourgeoisie drove economic growth.

Lecture by Dr Paul Salveson, Visiting Professor at the Universities of Bolton and Huddersfield

Wednesday, 20 March 2024, 2pm at Liverpool Athenaeum, Church Alley, Liverpool,L1 3DD
Entrance is by ticket only

In his latest publication Dr Salveson explores the cultural heritage and identity of Lancashire, stretching from the Mersey to the Lake District, charting the county’s transformation from a largely agricultural region noted for its religious learning into the Industrial Revolution’s powerhouse, as an emerging self-confident bourgeoisie drove economic growth. This capital boom came with a cultural blossoming, creating today’s Lancashire.

Lancashire developed a distinct business culture, but this was also the birthplace of the world co-operative movement, and the heart of democracy campaigns including Chartism and women’s suffrage. Lancashire has generally welcomed incomers, who have long helped to inform its distinctive identity: fourteenth-century Flemish weavers; nineteenth-century Irish immigrants and Jewish refugees; and, more recently, ‘New Lancastrians’ from Asia, Africa and Eastern Europe.

Tickets are free but early booking is advised as numbers are limited – to get your ticket go to Eventbrite

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Another chance to see our February 2024 Lecture: Northeast Wales and parts of Cheshire are traditionally thought to be areas where relatively little ‘high-status’ rural settlement existed during the Roman period but this view has been challenged by the discovery of a Roman villa near Wrexham in 2021. In this talk Dr Caroline Pudney from the University of Chester reports on the ‘In Search of Roman Rural Settlement’ project.

Roman villa model

Lecture by Dr Caroline Pudney, Senior Lecture in Archaeology, University of Chester recorded on 21 February 2024

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gk-3b8Yq-ZA/

Northeast Wales and parts of Cheshire are traditionally thought to be areas where relatively little ‘high-status’ rural settlement existed during the Roman period. Instead the landscape is considered to be largely populated by military, industrial and associated settlements. However, the discovery of a Roman villa near Wrexham in 2021 potentially challenges this thesis. When considered in conjunction with broader evidence for Roman activity, such as from metal detected finds, it points to a more vibrant part of Britannia than previously thought. This talk introduces the ‘In Search of Roman Rural Settlement’ project, with updates on the Rossett villa excavations, the ongoing research and potential avenues for future developments.

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Another chance to see our November 2023 Lecture - Professor R.C. Richardson looks at the career of historian Joan Thirsk (1922-2013) who did so much to re-define what the properly contextualised study of English local history could be and could do. Although chiefly a specialist in agrarian history, her interests extended far more broadly and the lecture offers an overall assessment of her landmark status.

With an immensely productive career spanning several decades first at the University of Leicester and then at Oxford, Joan Thirsk (1922-2013) did so much to re-define what the properly contextualised study of English local history could be and do.

Chiefly a specialist in the field of agrarian history, her academic interests extended far more broadly and she made her mark in all the various subjects she addressed, among them food history, internal trade, inheritance customs, consumerism, cross-cultural contacts and the rural origins of industry. Her general editorship and part authorship of the monumental 10,000 page Agrarian History of England was her greatest achievement. This lecture offers an overall assessment of her landmark status.

Professor R.C.Richardson is Emeritus Professor of History at the University of Winchester and is President of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire. He is the author or editor of numerous books and articles on early modern England.

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This year's volume includes seven articles and 18 book reviews. Fresh insights are offered on a wide variety of subjects with the chronology ranging from the early modern period to 1914. There is perhaps more focus on scientific matters than in recent volumes and the spatial focus is on Lancashire. Also included is a retrospective look, fifty years on, at R.C. Richardson's key text, Puritanism in North-West England, by its author.

This volume is not available in digital form on our website at present. HSLC members receive a copy of this volume plus online access to this and other recent volumes through Liverpool University Press.

Front matter:
Editorial note
Notes on contributors

RESEARCH NOTE

Puritanism in North-West England: Fifty Years On
R.C. Richardson

ARTICLES

The Rise and Fall of the Shuttleworths of Asterley, Gentlemen
Steven Shuttleworth

The Ingenious Mr Towneley: Collaborator, Patron, and Pioneer in Seventeenth-century Science
Lois Roddy

The Royal Lancashire Astronomical and Meteorological Observatory: A Still-born Mancunian Project of the Early Victorian Period
D.J. Bryden

A Town Clerk Disgraced: The Case of John Lewthwaite of Lancaster
Philip J. Gooderson

An ‘Exceptionally’ Modest Working-Class Dwelling? 10 Hockenhall Abbey, Liverpool
Lucy Kilfoyle

The Tracts and Pamphlets of W.E. Gladstone
John Powell and Bertie Dockerill

Manchester’s Challenge to the Supremacy of the Liverpool Cotton Market c.1895 to 1914
Nigel Hall

Book Reviews

Report of the Council for the Year 2022

Council and Officers for 2022

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Another chance to see Dr Alan Crosby's lecture marking the 175th anniversary of our Society. While across Europe 1848 was the 'Year of Revolutions' there was no popular uprising in Lancashire and Cheshire but a quieter yet even more fundamental revolution in society, economy and landscape was taking place in the two counties. Was the founding of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire in that year perhaps a counter-reaction to this revolution?

Lecture by Dr Alan Crosby (independent historian)
Wednesday 21 June 2023

Across Europe, 1848 was ‘The Year of Revolutions’. While in Lancashire and Cheshire there was no insurrection or popular uprising, a quieter yet even more fundamental revolution in society, economy and landscape was taking place. The rapidly evolving transport infrastructure, the social reshaping resulting from large-scale migration, the demographic and physical impact of unprecedented urbanisation, the emergence of new structures of government and administration … all these and much more contributed to a world which was changing at awesome speed. The founding of the Historic Society of Lancashire and Cheshire in that year was perhaps a counter-reaction to this revolution: as the old-established frameworks of society seemed to crumble, and as the familiar sights gave way to the radically new and different, some felt a growing nostalgia for the past. The HSLC was a child of its time. In this 175th anniversary lecture we explore some aspects of that turbulent time across the two counties.

Alan Crosby MA DPhil FRHistS is an independent scholar specialising in the local and regional history of North West England. He is editor of The Local Historian, chair of the Lancashire Local History Federation, and a council member of the Record Society of Lancashire & Cheshire, the Chetham Society and the Cumberland and Westmorland Antiquarian and Archaeological Society.

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Hugh Gault explores the history of everyday lives in two contrasting parts of Liverpool at the start of the twentieth century: Blackstock Street in Vauxhall and Courtenay Road in Crosby. The two streets were only six miles apart but might have been different worlds.

Lecture by Hugh Gault (independent historian)

Wednesday, 15 March 2023, 2pm at Liverpool Athenaeum,  Church Alley, Liverpool,L1 3DD
Entrance is by ticket only

Hugh Gault explores the history of everyday lives in two contrasting parts of Liverpool at the start of the twentieth century: Blackstock Street in Vauxhall and Courtenay Road in Crosby. The two streets were only six miles apart but might have been different worlds.

Based on his book 1900 Liverpool Lives, he tells the stories of the two streets and some of the people who lived and worked there. Yet there were similarities as well, one of the most striking being the importance of strong women. He will also be talking about the research journey that led him to choose these streets.

Tickets are free but early booking is advised as numbers are limited – to get your ticket go to Eventbrite

 

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Another chance to catch Dr Mike Nevell's lecture exploring the revised regional research framework for the historic environment of North West England - compiled between 2016 and 2020 - summarising over a decade of archaeological, historic landscape, and historic building research within the region.

This work was undertaken by professionals, academics, and community-based individuals and groups and represents an extensive community effort in bringing this data together.

(This lecture was first delivered online on Wednesday 22 February 2023)

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This year's volume includes six articles and sixteen book reviews. Whilst a wide variety of subject matter is presented, the spatial and chronological focus of this year's articles, in comparison to those in recent editions, is Lancashire-centric and modern. The inter-disciplinary nature of Transactions is underlined by James Moore and Catherine Site's article focusing on Lancashire's pioneering impressionist painters. Also included is a retrospective look at John Walton's key text, Lancashire: a social history 1558-1939.

This volume is not available in digital form on our website at present. HSLC members receive a copy of this volume plus online access to this and other recent volumes through Liverpool University Press.

Front matter:
Editorial note
Notes on contributors

RESEARCH NOTES

Retrospective: Thirty-five Years On: John K. Walton, Lancashire: A Social History 1558-1939
Alan Crosby

Liverpool’s Renewed Liberalism: Britain’s Third Party in Post-war Merseyside Politics
Marc Collinson

ARTICLES

Administration of Justice in Victorian Cheshire, 1840-1890: A Quantitive Survey
John Wallisss

Attitudes to Male Homosexuality in Late Victorian England: Charles Freston, a Case Study
Anthony Tibbles

Lancashire’s Pioneering Impressionists: The Manchester School of Painters and its Critics, 1868-1914
James Moore and Catherine Tite

City of Plague: Victorian Liverpool’s Response to Epidemic
Marie Riley

Decolonisation, Diversification, and Decline: Liverpool Shipping at the End of Empire
Nicholas J. White

Three Cheers for the Pirates! The History of Merseyside Smugglers and Wreckers: Realities, Myths and Legacies
James Houghton

Book Reviews

Report of Council for the Year 2021

Council and Officers for 2021

Cover Image: Adapted from Liverpool Mersey Docks and Harbour Board Docks, ‘Plan Shewing river entrances to Sandon half-tide dock also passages to adjoining docks’, c.1909

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This year's volume includes ten articles and fourteen book reviews covering a broad range of time periods and geographical areas within the two historic counties of Cheshire and Lancashire together with a compelling argument for placing the Battle of Brunanburh in the Wirral. In addition two research notes reflect the work of past and possibly future historians with a reflection on P. F. Clarke's seminal work, Lancashire and the New Liberalism while pupils from a Bolton Primary School look back at the experience of evacuees in World War Two.

This volume is not available in digital form on our website at present. HSLC members receive a copy of this volume plus online access to this and other recent volumes through Liverpool University Press.

Front matter:
Editorial note
Notes on contributors

RESEARCH NOTES

Researching War-time Evacuation with Belmont Street Primary School Children
George Skinner and Judith Peel

Lancashire and the New Liberalism: A Half-century Retrospective
Marc Collinson

ARTICLES

A Wirral Location for the Battle of Brunanburh
Clare Downham

Inheritance and Identity in Pennine Lancashire: The Stansfields of Inchfield, Walsden, 1591-1767
R. E. Stansfield-Cudworth

The Preston Cock, Adultery, Homophobia and the First Petition for Female Suffrage
John Belcham

Morris Ranger: The Rise and Fall of the Liverpool Cotton Market’s Greatest Speculator, 1835 to 1887
Nigel Hall

The Memoir of Florence Garstang (1870-1941): Honour, Injustice, and Gendered Sacrifice in an Upwardly Mobile Blackburn Family
Penny Bayer

Anglican Nuns Come to Liverpool
Janet Hollinshead and Pat Starkey

Community, Class and Identity: An Analysis of the Harle Syke Strike, 1915
Jack Southern

‘Liverpool’s first Labour MP’: The Untold Story of the Edge Hill By-election of March 2023
Paul A. Nuttall

Book Reviews

Report of Council for the Year 2020

Council and Officers for 2020

Cover Image: St Margaret’s Church, Princes Road, Liverpool (Hugo Lang & Co Series Postcard, 6493. First published, 1906.

 

 

 

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This year's volume offers a wealth and breadth of subjects and periods with transport, housing and civil politics, particularly in Liverpool, being the dominant themes. It also offers a contrast of places visited - from Speke Hall to a Cheshire residential street. In the aftermath of 2019's commemoration of the Peterloo Massacre there is a detailed look at the role the military played while the opening article explores hot air-ballooning in the late eighteenth century.

This volume is not available in digital form on our website at present but Liverpool University Press have currently made this particular volume available on free access until February 2024. Go to their website to find the articles listed below.

Front matter:
Editorial note
Notes on contributors

ARTICLES

Thomas Baldwin and the Creation of the Hot Air Balloon as a Scientific and Aesthetic Site of Knowledge in the Late Eighteenth Century
Fiona Amery

Through Other Eyes: Changing Attitudes in the Decoration and Interpretation of an English Country House, Speke Hall, Liverpool
Anthony Tibbles

Cavalry in Aid of the Civil Power: Hussars and Yeomanry at Peterloo, 1819
John H. Rumsby

The Regulation of Chemical Nuisances in Liverpool, c. 1820-1840
Richard A. Hawes

‘If you strike a King you must kill him’: Sir Archbald Salvidge and the Revolt of Liverpool’s Conservative MPs, 1927-1928
Paul A. Nuttall

G.H. Tupling (1883-1962): Pioneer of Regional Economic History in the North West
R. C. Richardson

‘Liverpool’s best bedroom’? The Development of One Wirral Street, 1840-1950
Christine Verguson

RESEARCH NOTE

Cheshire’s Celtic Place-Names
Andrew Breeze

Book Reviews

Council and Officers for 2019

Cover Image: Speke Hall from the south west by Anthony Tibbles

 

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